On the road in severe wintry weather

Winter weather in the United Kingdom is somewhat less demanding than, for example, that in North America, but even when temperatures are only a few degrees below zero (°C), and given strong winds and/or sufficient snow, some of our upland areas can be hazardous for travellers; and, of course, more people travel further afield now throughout Europe and North America during winter/early spring, e.g. on business or on skiing holidays.

The notes below may be of some use.

IN PREPARATION:

Keep a survival kit in your car... this should include:....
(*=items that might usefully be on the vehicle at all times.)

OTHER THINGS TO HAVE WITH YOU:.....



NOTES RELATING TO CLOTHING:.....

(Notes re: hypothermia:...Death from cold (aka as hypothermia), will occur when the overall body temperature fall below 28 °C. The ‘inner core’ of the body must remain at around 37.5°C in order to function properly; A couple of degrees colder, and mild hypothermia occurs, and this can be detected as shivering, which is the way the human body will have of trying to create heat; Below about 33°C, the situation becomes serious, and is likely to lead to unconsciousness and unless the body temperature is brought back to near-normal levels quickly, the lack of activity will soon lead to death.)


WHAT TO DO IF YOU BECOME STRANDED:....

 



In the United Kingdom, the Met.Office is responsible for the National Severe Weather Warning Service, and by this mechanism, relayed via the normal tv and radio weather forecasts, will attempt to give at least 2 days warning of potential severe weather. Notwithstanding this service, all forecasts should be monitored closely if you intend to travel in areas that might be subject to severe winter weather. Remember though that because of time constraints imposed by broadcasters, details of extreme weather in remote areas cannot be given the due time it deserves. This is particularly true of Scotland, where forecasts provided on a (UK) national basis often concentrate on the central belt, and the populated east and north-eastern regions of the country. Forecasts provided by regional weather centres, via recorded telephone or local/regional television and radio presentations are better.